How to Setup Odoo 14 in CentOS 7

Odoo is currently one of the most popular tool for business purposes. It has a community edition, that allows managing ERP at very low cost. Odoo was previously known as OpenERP. Odoo requires to be installed on a dedicated server or VPS. Odoo 14 had come out already. I will have a straight forward how to on installing the latest Odoo 14 in CentOS 7.

Log in to your system and update

First step would be to login to your system and then update the system using yum.

ssh [email protected]_ip

You may check the CentOS version from the redhat release file using the following:

cat /etc/redhat-release

It should show you something like the following if you

CentOS Linux release 7.8.2003 (Core)

Now, you may try updating the system with yum

yum update -y

Once done, now install the EPEL repository as we need it to satisfy a couple of dependecies:

yum install epel-release

Install Python 3.6 packages and Odoo dependencies

We need Python 3.6 at least to run Odoo 14. Odoo 13 also ran on Python 3.6. We will use ‘Software Collection (scl)’ repository to install and use Python 3.6. To find the available Python versions in SCL, you may check the following:

SCL Repository for Python

Now, to install Python 3.6 using SCL, we first need to install the SCL repository for Centos:

yum install centos-release-scl

Once the SCL is loaded, now, you may install the python 3.6 using the following command:

yum install rh-python36

Once the Python is installed, now we will install several tools and packages for Odoo dependencies with the following command:

yum install git gcc nano wget nodejs-less libxslt-devel bzip2-devel openldap-devel libjpeg-devel freetype-devel

Create Odoo User

We now need to create a system user and group for Odoo and define a home directory to /opt/odoo

useradd -m -U -r -d  /opt/odoo -s /bin/bash odoo

You may use any username here, but remember to create the same username for the PostgreSQL as well.

Install PostgreSQL

CentOS base repository unfortunately, comes with Postgresql 9.2. But we want to use PostgreSQL 10 for our Odoo installation. You may check the available PostgreSQL for CentOS 7 using the following command:

yum list postgresql*

As by default CentOS 7 does not provide the PostgreSQL 10, we would use PostgreSQL official repository to download and install the 10 version.

First, we install the Postgres Yum Repository using the following command:

yum install https://download.postgresql.org/pub/repos/yum/10/redhat/rhel-7-x86_64/pgdg-redhat-repo-latest.noarch.rpm

Now, you may install PostgreSQL 10 and related required packages using the following command:

yum install postgresql10 postgresql10-server postgresql10-contrib postgresql10-libs -y

Now, we need to initialize the postgres database and start it. You may do that using the following:

# Initialize the DB
/usr/pgsql-10/bin/postgresql-10-setup initdb

# Start the database
systemctl start postgresql-10.service

If everything goes alright, now you may check the postgresql 10 status:

[[email protected] bin]# systemctl status postgresql-10.service
● postgresql-10.service - PostgreSQL 10 database server
   Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/postgresql-10.service; disabled; vendor preset: disabled)
   Active: active (running) since Mon 2021-04-05 16:42:15 EDT; 5s ago
     Docs: https://www.postgresql.org/docs/10/static/
  Process: 6380 ExecStartPre=/usr/pgsql-10/bin/postgresql-10-check-db-dir ${PGDATA} (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
 Main PID: 6386 (postmaster)
    Tasks: 8
   Memory: 13.5M
   CGroup: /system.slice/postgresql-10.service
           ├─6386 /usr/pgsql-10/bin/postmaster -D /var/lib/pgsql/10/data/
           ├─6388 postgres: logger process
           ├─6390 postgres: checkpointer process
           ├─6391 postgres: writer process
           ├─6392 postgres: wal writer process
           ├─6393 postgres: autovacuum launcher process
           ├─6394 postgres: stats collector process
           └─6395 postgres: bgworker: logical replication launcher

Now you may enable Postgres to start when booting up using the systemctl enable command:

systemctl enable postgresql-10.service

Now, we need to create a database user for our Odoo installation. You may do that using the following:

su - postgres -c "createuser -s odoo"

Note: If you have created a different user for Odoo installation other than ‘odoo’ than you should change the username here as well.

Install Wkhtmltopdf

Wkhtmltopdf is a open source tool to make html in pdf format so that you may print pdf reports. This tool is used by Odoo and requires to be installed as dependency. CentOS 7 repository does not provide the latest version of this tool, and Odoo requires you to use the latest version. Hence, we require to download the latest version from the Wkhtmltopdf website and install it. To do that, you may first visit the page:

https://wkhtmltopdf.org/downloads.html

The page gives you the direct rpm download link for each version of CentOS/Ubuntu/Mac etc. Download the stable version for CentOS 7. At the time of writing, the URL for CentOS 7 x86_64 bit is the following:

https://github.com/wkhtmltopdf/packaging/releases/download/0.12.6-1/wkhtmltox-0.12.6-1.centos7.x86_64.rpm

You may install this using the following:

cd /opt/
wget https://github.com/wkhtmltopdf/packaging/releases/download/0.12.6-1/wkhtmltox-0.12.6-1.centos7.x86_64.rpm
yum localinstall wkhtmltox-0.12.6-1.centos7.x86_64.rpm

Install and Configure Odoo 14

If you have come all through here, that means you are done with the all dependency installations before starting to download Odoo 14 source code. We will download Odoo 14 from it’s Github repo and use virtualenv to create an isolated python environment to install this python software.

First, login as odoo from root:

su - odoo

Clone the Odoo source code from Github repository:

git clone https://www.github.com/odoo/odoo --depth 1 --branch 14.0 /opt/odoo/odoo14

This will bring the Odoo 14 branch from the Odoo repository and put it inside the folder /opt/odoo/odoo14

Now, we need to enable software collections in order to access python binaries:

scl enable rh-python36 bash

Then we need to create a virtual environment to complete the installation:

cd /opt/odoo
python3 -m venv odoo14-venv

Now, you may activate the virtual environment you have just created:

source odoo14-venv/bin/activate

Now, we upgrade the pip and install the wheel library:

pip install --upgrade pip
pip3 install wheel

Once done, now we can using pip3 to install all the required Python modules from the requirements.txt file:

pip3 install -r odoo14/requirements.txt

Once the installation is complete, now we can deactivate the virtual environment and get back to the root user

deactivate && exit ; exit

If you think, you will create custom modules, you may now create it and give odoo the permission accordingly:

mkdir /opt/odoo/odoo14-custom-addons
chown odoo: /opt/odoo/odoo14-custom-addons

Now, we can fill up the odoo configuration file. First open the odoo.conf file:

nano /etc/odoo.conf

You may paste the following inside:

[options]
; This is the password that allows database operations:
admin_passwd = set_the_password_to_create_odoo_database
db_host = False
db_port = False
db_user = odoo
db_password = False
addons_path = /opt/odoo/odoo14/addons,/opt/odoo/odoo14-custom-addons
; You can enable log file with uncommenting the next line
; logfile = /var/log/odoo14/odoo.log

Please do not forget to change the password ‘set_the_password_to_create_odoo_database’ with a new strong password. This would be used to create Odoo databases from the login screen.

Create the systemd service file and start Odoo 14

Now, we will create a service file, to be able to start, stop and restart Odoo daemon. To do that, first create a service file using the following:

nano /etc/systemd/system/odoo14.service
[Unit]
Description=Odoo14
Requires=postgresql-10.service
After=network.target postgresql-10.service
[Service]
Type=simple
SyslogIdentifier=odoo14
PermissionsStartOnly=true
User=odoo
Group=odoo
ExecStart=/usr/bin/scl enable rh-python36 -- /opt/odoo/odoo14-venv/bin/python3 /opt/odoo/odoo14/odoo-bin -c /etc/odoo.conf
StandardOutput=journal+console
[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

Now, save the file and exit.

Now, you need to reload the systemd daemon to be able to read the latest changes you have made to services. To do that, run:

systemctl daemon-reload

Finally, now we can start Odoo 14 instance using the following command:

systemctl start odoo14

If you are interested to check the status of the instance, you may do this:

systemctl status odoo14

It show green active running, if everything worked out. If you see no error, you may now enable Odoo to start during the boot:

systemctl enable odoo14

If you would like to see the logs, you may either use the journal tools like the following:

journalctl -u odoo14

or uncomment the following line to log the debugs in /etc/odoo.conf

logfile = /var/log/odoo14/odoo.log

After making any change to /etc/odoo.conf, do not forget the restart the Odoo14 instance using systemctl.

Test the Installation


Odoo is currently one of the most popular tool for business purposes. It has a community edition, that allows managing ERP at very low cost. Odoo was previously known as OpenERP. Odoo requires to be installed on a dedicated server or VPS. Odoo 13 had come out on October, 2019. Odoo 14 hasn’t been released yet for production. I will have a straight forward how to on installing the latest Odoo 13 in CentOS 7.

Log in to your system and update

First step would be to login to your system and then update the system using yum.ssh [email protected]_ip

You may check the CentOS version from the redhat release file using the following:cat /etc/redhat-release

It should show you something like the following if youCentOS Linux release 7.8.2003 (Core)

Now, you may try updating the system with yumyum update -y

Once done, now install the EPEL repository as we need it to satisfy a couple of dependecies:yum install epel-release

Install Python 3.6 packages and Odoo dependencies

We need Python 3.6 at least to run Odoo 13. Odoo 12 had support for Python 3.5, unfortunately, Odoo 13 doesn’t. We will use ‘Software Collection (scl)’ repository to install and use Python 3.6. To find the available Python versions in SCL, you may check the following:

SCL Repository for Python

Now, to install Python 3.6 using SCL, we first need to install the SCL repository for Centos:yum install centos-release-scl

Once the SCL is loaded, now, you may install the python 3.6 using the following command:yum install rh-python36

Once the Python is installed, now we will install several tools and packages for Odoo dependencies with the following command:yum install git gcc nano wget nodejs-less libxslt-devel bzip2-devel openldap-devel libjpeg-devel freetype-devel

Create Odoo User

We now need to create a system user and group for Odoo and define a home directory to /opt/odoouseradd -m -U -r -d /opt/odoo -s /bin/bash odoo

You may use any username here, but remember to create the same username for the PostgreSQL as well.

Install PostgreSQL

CentOS base repository unfortunately, comes with Postgresql 9.2. But we want to use PostgreSQL 9.6 for our Odoo installation. You may check the available PostgreSQL for CentOS 7 using the following command:yum list postgresql*

As by default CentOS 7 does not provide the PostgreSQL 9.6, we would use PostgreSQL official repository to download and install the 9.6 version.

First, we install the Postgres Yum Repository using the following command:yum install https://download.postgresql.org/pub/repos/yum/9.6/redhat/rhel-7-x86_64/pgdg-redhat-repo-latest.noarch.rpm

Now, you may install PostgreSQL 9.6 and related required packages using the following command:yum install postgresql96 postgresql96-server postgresql96-contrib postgresql96-libs

Now, we need to initialize the postgres database and start it. You may do that using the following:# Initialize the DB/usr/pgsql-9.6/bin/postgresql96-setup initdb# Start the databasesystemctl start postgresql-9.6.service

Now you may enable Postgres to start when booting up using the systemctl enable command:systemctl enable postgresql-9.6.service

Now, we need to create a database user for our Odoo installation. You may do that using the following:su – postgres -c “createuser -s odoo”

Note: If you have created a different user for Odoo installation other than ‘odoo’ than you should change the username here as well.

Install Wkhtmltopdf

Wkhtmltopdf is a open source tool to make html in pdf format so that you may print pdf reports. This tool is used by Odoo and requires to be installed as dependency. CentOS 7 repository does not provide the latest version of this tool, and Odoo requires you to use the latest version. Hence, we require to download the latest version from the Wkhtmltopdf website and install it. To do that, you may first visit the page:https://wkhtmltopdf.org/downloads.html

The page gives you the direct rpm download link for each version of CentOS/Ubuntu/Mac etc. Download the stable version for CentOS 7. At the time of writing, the URL for CentOS 7 x86_64 bit is the following:https://github.com/wkhtmltopdf/packaging/releases/download/0.12.6-1/wkhtmltox-0.12.6-1.centos7.x86_64.rpm

You may install this using the following:cd /opt/wget https://github.com/wkhtmltopdf/packaging/releases/download/0.12.6-1/wkhtmltox-0.12.6-1.centos7.x86_64.rpmyum localinstall wkhtmltox-0.12.6-1.centos7.x86_64.rpm

Install and Configure Odoo 13

If you have come all through here, that means you are done with the all dependency installations before starting to download Odoo 13 source code. We will download Odoo 13 from it’s Github repo and use virtualenv to create an isolated python environment to install this python software.

First, login as odoo from root:su – odoo

Clone the Odoo source code from Github repository:git clone https://www.github.com/odoo/odoo –depth 1 –branch 13.0 /opt/odoo/odoo13

This will bring the Odoo 13 branch from the Odoo repository and put it inside the folder /opt/odoo/odoo13

Now, we need to enable software collections in order to access python binaries:scl enable rh-python36 bash

Then we need to create a virtual environment to complete the installation:cd /opt/odoopython3 -m venv odoo13-venv

Now, you may activate the virtual environment you have just created:source odoo13-venv/bin/activate

Now, we upgrade the pip and install the wheel library:pip install –upgrade pippip3 install wheel

Once done, now we can using pip3 to install all the required Python modules from the requirements.txt file:pip3 install -r odoo13/requirements.txt

Once the installation is complete, now we can deactivate the virtual environment and get back to the root userdeactivate && exit ; exit

If you think, you will create custom modules, you may now create it and give odoo the permission accordingly:mkdir /opt/odoo/odoo13-custom-addonschown odoo: /opt/odoo/odoo13-custom-addons

Now, we can fill up the odoo configuration file. First open the odoo.conf file:nano /etc/odoo.conf

You may paste the following inside:[options]; This is the password that allows database operations:admin_passwd = set_the_password_to_create_odoo_databasedb_host = Falsedb_port = Falsedb_user = odoodb_password = Falseaddons_path = /opt/odoo/odoo13/addons,/opt/odoo/odoo13-custom-addons; You can enable log file with uncommenting the next line; logfile = /var/log/odoo13/odoo.log

Please do not forget to change the password ‘set_the_password_to_create_odoo_database’ with a new strong password. This would be used to create Odoo databases from the login screen.

Create the systemd service file and start Odoo 13

Now, we will create a service file, to be able to start, stop and restart Odoo daemon. To do that, first create a service file using the following:nano /etc/systemd/system/odoo13.service

and paste the following:[Unit]Description=Odoo13Requires=postgresql-9.6.serviceAfter=network.target postgresql-9.6.service[Service]Type=simpleSyslogIdentifier=odoo13PermissionsStartOnly=trueUser=odooGroup=odooExecStart=/usr/bin/scl enable rh-python35 — /opt/odoo/odoo13-venv/bin/python3 /opt/odoo/odoo13/odoo-bin -c /etc/odoo.confStandardOutput=journal+console[Install]WantedBy=multi-user.target

Now, save the file and exit.

Now, you need to reload the systemd daemon to be able to read the latest changes you have made to services. To do that, run:systemctl daemon-reload

Finally, now we can start Odoo 13 instance using the following command:systemctl start odoo13

If you are interested to check the status of the instance, you may do this:systemctl status odoo13[[email protected] ~]# systemctl status odoo13● odoo13.service – Odoo13 Loaded: loaded (/etc/systemd/system/odoo13.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled) Active: active (running) since Sun 2020-09-13 08:26:46 EDT; 23h ago Main PID: 24502 (scl) CGroup: /system.slice/odoo13.service ├─24502 /usr/bin/scl enable rh-python36 — /opt/odoo/odoo13-venv/bin/python3 /opt/odoo/odoo13/odoo-bin -c /etc/odoo.conf ├─24503 /bin/bash /var/tmp/sclSWH04z └─24507 /opt/odoo/odoo13-venv/bin/python3 /opt/odoo/odoo13/odoo-bin -c /etc/odoo.conf

It show green active running, if everything worked out. If you see no error, you may now enable Odoo to start during the boot:systemctl enable odoo13

If you would like to see the logs, you may either use the journal tools like the following:journalctl -u odoo13

or uncomment the following line to log the debugs in /etc/odoo.conflogfile = /var/log/odoo13/odoo.log

After making any change to /etc/odoo.conf, do not forget the restart the Odoo13 instance using systemctl.

Test the Installation

You may now test the installation using http://your_server_ip:8069. If everything worked, it should come up. If it doesn’t, you may try stopping your ‘firewalld’ to see if firewall is blocking the port or not:

systemctl stop firewalld

At Mellowhost, we provide Odoo installation and configuration assistance for absolute free of charge. If you are willing to try out any of our VPS for Odoo, you may do so and talk with us through the Live chat or the ticket for Odoo assistance.

Furthermore, Good luck.

-bash: smartctl: command not found

Error Details

When I try to check the S.M.A.R.T details of my drive, using the following command:

smartctl -a /dev/sda

I get an error:

-bash: smartctl: command not found

What can I do?

Solution

This error is appearing because you do not have the S.M.A.R.T tools installed on your system.

How to Install Smart tools on CentOS 7?

To install smart tools, you can run the following:

yum install smartmontools -y

Once done, you may run the smartctl command again, and it shall work:

[[email protected] ~]# smartctl -a /dev/sda
smartctl 7.0 2018-12-30 r4883 [x86_64-linux-3.10.0-1127.el7.x86_64] (local build)
Copyright (C) 2002-18, Bruce Allen, Christian Franke, www.smartmontools.org

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Model Family:     Crucial/Micron BX/MX1/2/3/500, M5/600, 1100 SSDs
Device Model:     Micron_1100_MTFDDAK2T0TBN

How to reset root password in CentOS 7

Resetting admin password in CentOS 7 is different than of CentOS 6, as CentOS 7 utilized Grub 2 and has a different procedure to access Single User Mode. First, boot your system in Single User Mode to reset the root password by following the below tutorial:

Once done, now, you may first chroot the system:

chroot /sysroot

Now, you may reset the password using the following:

passwd root

You should be done. If you are using SELinux, then you need to relabel accordingly:

touch /.autorelabel

Then, exit chroot and reboot the system:

exit && reboot

You should be done now.

How to boot CentOS 7 in Single User Mode

Booting CentOS 7 in single user mode is total different than of CentOS 6 as it uses a different version of Grub. We will go step by step to boot into single user mode in CentOS 7.

  1. First, boot the screen and press an arrow key while the timer comes on this screen to stop the timer

    CentOS 7 Boot Screen

  2. Press ‘e’ on the selected default CentOS version. That will take you to the following screen

    CentOS 7 Boot Edit Screen

  3. These are grub commands that the bootloader is using to boot you to the system. Arrow down in this window to the line, that starts with linux16. Now take the right arrow on the keyboard to take your cursor to the word that says ‘ro’ as shown in the image

    Linux16 Command Boot

  4. Now replace ro with rw init=/sysroot/bin/sh as shown below

    CentOS 7 Boot Sysroot

  5. Now press Ctrl + x to start Single User Mode

    Boot in Single User Mode CentOS 7

You should be done now, you are on the single user mode console. If you would like to use the main system, you may chroot as the following:

chroot /sysroot

Now, if you are trying to reset the root password, after booting into the single user mode, you may follow the following to reset the root password:

Troubleshoot: -bash: fuser: command not found

If you are trying to use a command, fuser, that is used to identify process using lock file or socket file, and having the following error:

-bash: fuser: command not found

that means, your system doesn’t have the psmisc package installed. Usually, killall, fuser type of commands are under this package. CentOS 7 sometimes, do not install the package by default. To install it, run the following:

yum install psmisc -y

Once done, you should be able to use fuser command.

Troubleshoot: fatal: open lock file /var/lib/postfix/master.lock: unable to set exclusive lock

Error Message & Trace details:

One of my customer came with an error saying the postfix in his server isn’t working. The server was running CentOS 7, and the system postfix status was inactive, means not running. Although, the system queue was running I could see. The error that was returning while restarting/checking status was the following:

# service postfix status
Redirecting to /bin/systemctl status postfix.service
● postfix.service - Postfix Mail Transport Agent
Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/postfix.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)
Active: failed (Result: exit-code) since Tue 2018-01-09 04:04:05 UTC; 1s ago
Process: 9201 ExecStart=/usr/sbin/postfix start (code=exited, status=1/FAILURE)
Process: 9197 ExecStartPre=/usr/libexec/postfix/chroot-update (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
Process: 9194 ExecStartPre=/usr/libexec/postfix/aliasesdb (code=exited, status=0/SUCCESS)
Main PID: 1358 (code=killed, signal=TERM)

Jan 09 04:04:03 twin7.hifrank.biz systemd[1]: Starting Postfix Mail Transport Agent...
Jan 09 04:04:03 twin7.hifrank.biz postfix/master[9273]: fatal: open lock file /var/lib/postfix/master.lock: unable to set exclusive lock: Resource tempo...vailable
Jan 09 04:04:04 twin7.hifrank.biz postfix/master[9272]: fatal: daemon initialization failure
Jan 09 04:04:05 twin7.hifrank.biz postfix/postfix-script[9274]: fatal: mail system startup failed
Jan 09 04:04:05 twin7.hifrank.biz systemd[1]: postfix.service: control process exited, code=exited status=1
Jan 09 04:04:05 twin7.hifrank.biz systemd[1]: Failed to start Postfix Mail Transport Agent.
Jan 09 04:04:05 twin7.hifrank.biz systemd[1]: Unit postfix.service entered failed state.
Jan 09 04:04:05 twin7.hifrank.biz systemd[1]: postfix.service failed.

How to fix:

The error to note here is the following:

fatal: open lock file /var/lib/postfix/master.lock

I first killed the smtp and smtpd processes that runs by postfix:

# killall -9 smtp
# killall -9 smtpd

But that didn’t solve the problem. I then used the fuser command to check which process holds the lock file:

# fuser /var/lib/postfix/master.lock
/var/lib/postfix/master.lock: 18698

Then we check the process 18698 and kill the responsible process:

# ps -axwww|grep 18698
9333 pts/0 S+ 0:00 grep --color=auto 18698

18698 ? Ss 4:28 /usr/libexec/postfix/master -w
# killall -9 /usr/libexec/postfix/master
or
# kill -9 18698

Once the process is killed, you can now start the postfix:

# service postfix start
# service postfix status|grep Active
Redirecting to /bin/systemctl status postfix.service
Active: active (running) since Tue 2018-01-09 04:15:50 UTC; 4min 45s ago

Troubleshoot: killall command not found in centos 7

Problem:

If you are using a centos 7 minimal installation, and trying to kill process by name using the command ‘killall’, you are most likely going to see the error:

# killall -9 php
killall: command not found

The error appears because CentOS 7 encourages you to use pkill instead of killall to kill process by name. pkill has versatile application, although, it can be used to kill process by name same as killall.

How to kill process by name in Centos 7

You can use pkill. pkill is a simple command. It’s syntax is as following:

# pkill processname

For example, if you want to kill all the php process, run:

# pkill php

Note: It will kill all the processes that match php. To list the process that pkill going to kill, you can use pgrep as following:

# pgrep -l php

How to use killall in Centos 7

If you do not want to use pkill, and keep using killall commands in centos 7, this is also possible. killall is a part of psmisc yum package. All you have to do, is to install psmisc in your system using yum

# yum install psmisc
# killall -9 php

 

How to install ifconfig in CentOS 7

CentOS 7 doesn’t come with ifconfig tools. It encourages users to use ‘ip’ tool for network administration. Although, it is still possible to use ifconfig with CentOS 7. ifconfig is a part of net-tools package. All you have to do is to install the net-tools package using yum.

How to install ifconfig in CentOS 7

Run the following command to install net-tools package in CentOS 7, this will install ifconfig as well:

# yum install net-tools -y
# ifconfig

How to: Change Timezone in CentOS / RHEL 6 & CentOS / RHEL 7

How to change Timezone in CentOS 6 / RHEL 6

In CentOS 6, timezone files are located under /usr/share/zoneinfo. So, if your zone is for example, America/Chicago (UTC -6), it would be /usr/share/zoneinfo/America/Chicago and so on.

CentOS 6, uses a file called ‘localtime’ located under /etc to determine it’s currently set timezone.

# ls -la /etc/localtime

This file, is either the actual time zone file moved to this location or a symlink to the timezone under zoneinfo directory. So if you want to change the timezone, first you need to determine which timezone to use and then symlink it to localtime. You can do that using the following:

# rm -f /etc/localtime
# ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Asia/Dhaka /etc/localtime
# date

This would set the current timezone to GMT +6 BDT or Asia/Dhaka timezone, zone I belong to.

How to change timezone in CentOS 7 or RHEL 7

CentOS 7, comes with a tool called ‘timedatectl’. This can be used to find and set the symlink for you instead of doing the work that were required in CentOS 6.

To list available time zones, run:

# timedatectl list-timezones

You can find your desired timezone, as following:

# timedatectl list-timezones | grep Chicago

Now, to set a time zone, use the command set-timezone with timedatectl command. For example, if I want to set the time zone to America/Chicago, I would run the following:

# timedatectl set-timezone America/Chicago
# date

This also should create the symlink of locatime file to the zoneinfo directory. You can see that with the following:

# ls -l /etc/localtime

Linux How To: Install IPTABLES in CentOS 7 / RHEL 7 Replacing FirewallD

CentOS 7 / RHEL 7 doesn’t come with iptables by default. It uses a full functional firewall system called ‘firewalld’. I have been a big fan of iptables and it’s capability from the very first, and since I have switched to CentOS 7, I couldn’t stop using it. I had to stop firewalld and install iptables in all of my CentOS 7 installation and start using iptables rules as I was using before. Here is a small How To guide on installing Iptables and disabling firewalld from a CentOS 7 or RHEL 7 or a similar variant distro.

How to Install IPTABLES in CentOS 7

To begin using iptables, you need to download and install iptables-service package from the repo. It isn’t installed automatically on CentOS 7. To do that, run the following command:

# yum install iptables-services -y

How to stop the firewalld service and start the Iptables service

Once the iptables-serivces package is installed, you can now stop the firewalld and start the iptables. Keeping both kind of network filtering too can create conflicts and it is recommended to use any out of two. To do that run the following:

# systemctl stop firewalld
# systemctl start iptables

Now to disable firewalld from the starting after the boot, you need to disable the firewalld:

# systemctl disable firewalld

To disallow starting firewalld manually as well, you can mask it:

# systemctl mask firewalld

Now you can enable iptables to start at the boot time by enabling iptables using systemctl command:

# systemctl enable iptables

How to check status of iptables in centOS 7

In previous distros, iptables status could be fetched using service command, although, the option is no longer available in CentOS 7. To fetch the iptables status, use the following:

# iptables -S

Iptables save command can still be used using service tool:

# service iptables save

This would save your iptables rules to /etc/sysconfig/iptables as it used to do in previous distros.